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Here is the list of the stereotypes and false myths about Italy and Italians!

italians

Italians..which are the most common stereotypes and myths about them?

Every culture is associated to stereotypes and false myths often hard to dispel, and the Italian’s is not different. As per other culture, something that people consider “stereotypically Italian” correspond to reality, but there are also a lot of myths to be debunked!

 

 

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1) Italians always drink “Cappuccino” after lunch.

This is absolutely not true (and I can confirm it!). Italians have Cappuccino and Croissant just for breakfast! If an italian goes to the bar different time in a day, he/she will always drink a cup of espresso not a cappuccino!

 

 

2) Italy is always hot and sunny also during winter.
Of course Italy is famed for its Mediterranean climate, and the weather is quite usually warm until October but it can also be cold and damp. Winters exist, it could snow or rain and the temperatures could be below zero in some cases. So if you want to buy a house and retire in Italy, don’t be surprised if you will wear coat, hat, scarf and gloves like a snowman!

3) Italy = Mafia.
The Italian Mafia has captured Hollywood’s imagination for years. The Mafia is real (even if Italians are not proud of it) and it exists just like every other organised crime in every country around the world (let’s think about the Chinese Mafia, the Russian Mafia etc). But don’t be afraid of coming or living there. Nobody will shoot you in the middle of the street or will kidnap you.  Ordinary Italians don’t need necessarily to deal with a mafioso, the chances be in contact with the mafia while living or visiting Italy is practically nil.

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4) Italians are very fashionable.

Yes, absolutely true! Italians can be recognised km away simply looking at the way they dress. They are stylish for every occasion and like to wear high-quality fabrics. You won’t ever see an Italian wearing sporting short pants combined with long socks: it’s simply against their fashion rules! Italians want to appear nicely, and fashion is a big component of that.

5) People eat only pizza and spaghetti.

Italy is famous worldwide for pizza and spaghetti but Italians don’t eat only these! Travelling around Italy, you will notice that the menu can be very different depending on the region you go to. But one thing that you will find everywhere is that the quality of ingredients is always very high. Eating in Italy (the home of the Slow Food movement) is a serious business and it helps that most Italians are usually excellent cooks.

Italians do it better!

 

6) Italian men have an unhealthy obsession with their mothers.

Italian boys are also famous because they are “Mammoni” (Mama’s boy). 80% of Italian men above 30 years old still live with their parents. I know it is strange to understand for the most,  mammoni still have their mums who wash and clean for them, they have a lack of privacy and independence. But (usually) the reason why Italians stick with their parents for so long is mainly because of the unemployment.

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7) Italians Gesticulate

While speaking, Italians generally recur to body language to express themselves better. Italians simply cannot talk without their hands. If they are busy doing something else, they start moving shoulders or other parts of the body for emphasis. Italians speak very loudly in public whether on the bus, in the street or on the phone. Don’t worry, they are not all deaf. A lot of foreigners think italians are fighting when they talk that way but it’s just the way they are.

These are only few of the italian stereotypes…but you know that we can fill a book of all the good and bad stereotypes of this famous country!

Now that you know what Italians are truly like, you probably have even more admiration for this art-obsessed, stylish, and enthusiastic country.

 

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